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British Consulate Bali: What it can do for you

Visiting the British Consulate in Sanur yesterday I picked up a few flyers they have in the lobby. The free flyers have information on backpacking and independent travel, a checklist for travelers, info on the services provided by British Consular offices, info on waht to do if you are a victim of crime and info on how to handle a death overseas.

The British Consulate is located on Jl. Tirta Nadi in Sanur on the mountain side of the Bypass. Its new location provides a greater level of security than the previous location of the Cat & Fiddle Pub.
British Consulates are probably very similar to other consulates overseas, and can provide the following services:
Issue emergency passports;
Contact relatives and friends and ask them to help you with money and tickets;
Tell you how to transfer money;
In an emergency, cash you a sterling check worth up to 100 pounds if supported by a valid bankers card;
As a last resort, in exceptional circumstances, and as long as you meet certain strict rules, give you a loan to get you back to the UK, but only if there is no one else who can help you;
Help you get in touch with local lawyers, interpreters and doctors;
Arrange for next of kin to be told of an accident or death and advise on proceedures;
Visit you if you have been arrested or put in prison, and arrange for messages to be sent to relatives or friends;
Put you in touch with organisations who help trace missing persons;
Speak to the local authorities on your behalf;
Give you a list of local lawyers;
Here is a list of things the British Consulate can’t do
Intervene in court cases;
Get you out of prison;
Give you legal advice or start court proceeedings for you;
Give you better treatment in hospital or prison than is given to locals;
Investigate a crime;
Pay your hotel, legal, medical or any other bills;
Pay your travel costs, except in special circumstances;
Do work normally done by travel agents, airlines, banks or motoring organisations;
Get you somewhere to live, a job or work permit;
Demand you be treated as British, if you are a dual national in the country of your second nationality;